Literary source :

Before Action 

By all the glories of the day  And the cool evening’s benison  By that last sunset touch that lay  Upon the hills when day was done,  By beauty lavishly outpoured  And blessings carelessly received,  By all the days that I have lived  Make me a soldier, Lord.

By all of all man’s hopes and fears  And all the wonders poets sing,  The laughter of unclouded years,  And every sad and lovely thing;  By the romantic ages stored  With high endeavour that was his,  By all his mad catastrophes  Make me a man, O Lord.

I, that on my familiar hill  Saw with uncomprehending eyes  A hundred of thy sunsets spill  Their fresh and sanguine sacrifice,  Ere the sun swings his noonday sword  Must say good-bye to all of this; –  By all delights that I shall miss,  Help me to die, O Lord.

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/poems/william-noel-hodgson-before-action.htm

This source by Lieutenant William Noel Hodgson, MC, 29th June, 1916His first action before the last of his life and wrote this poem to die mentality. Prior to his death would like all good things farewell.He died just 23 years old only .

Artwork:

Bone mace right, left short tube Maxim. “Block me and die!”

Launch assault under cover of storm commandos gas.

In World War I, the British in Cambrai battlefield build 381 tanks launched a surprise attack, one day break through three lines of defense within the front pushed to near Mani Iyer after ten kilometers in depth. Ten days later, the Germans gathered commandos launched a counter attack, with smoke and poisonous gas, the front half of the push back within eight kilometers.

Visual source :

Everyone wants freedom, hit your enemy, war is not just a man’s thing, Western civilization needs of every man, woman and child!

Newspaper article :

Food grows scarce

“I am immensely pleased with the support which has been given by the public in very difficult circumstances,” Lord Rhondda said yesterday, in an interview with a representative of The Observer, on the scheme for rationing meat, butter and margarine, which comes into operation tomorrow in London and the home counties.

“I fully recognise,” he said, “the inconvenience and to some extent the privation to which the consumer is put; but in view of the conditions of war in which we are living, it is inevitable. And I am afraid it is no satisfaction to the man who has to go on a ration limited to half the meat he was getting in pre-war times to know that in Germany the average ration is less than half of what he will be getting in this country during the next few months.”

“Will the supplies now be sufficient,” his lordship was asked, “to meet the limited rations; that is to say, will there be 4oz a week of butter or margarine for each person in the country, and 1s 3d-worth of butcher’s meat, plus the amount of poultry (and so on) which may be bought with the fourth or any other meat coupon?”

“I have every reason to hope,” he replied, “that the supply of meat, butter and margarine – though I cannot absolutely guarantee it – will be sufficient to provide the ration which has been arranged.”

“And what is the prospect for the future?”

“I hope a little later on to provide a larger ration of meat for those who are engaged in hard manual labour.”

Everyone should have received a meat and food card from the local food committee and have registered it with his butcher and grocer. As, however, some delays are bound to occur, arrangements have been made for the committees to issue emergency tickets where necessary.

14 million persons in London and the home counties are affected by the scheme which comes into force tomorrow, and next month the rationing of meat will be extended to the whole country. A little patience must be exercised with the butcher. Monday is always a short day with the trade, and many shops are closed. It should not, therefore, be expected that even the restricted rations will be available everywhere tomorrow or even Saturday. It will take a little time to get this gigantic scheme into smooth working order. The Observer, Feb 24 1918

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/nov/11/first-world-war-rationing

When the First World War, growing food shortages, according to become a great inconvenience, lot of people can’t eat anything and they died .

  1. What was life like for the women , children and men who stayed at home ?

 

*How did men who were not fighting get treated ?

 

They can’t not fighting to get treated , they must fighting with the enemies , to get free 

* What challenges did people face ?

  Children and men did not have challenges they still ‘sleep’ 

* What advantages were there to being at war ? 

 

    Food and Terrain 

Gr.8   Jack chen 

Advertisements